Amitriptyline

What is Amitriptyline?

Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant. Amitriptyline affects chemicals within the brain which may possibly be unbalanced in people with depression.

It is used in the treatment of depression. Amitriptyline can also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You are not permitted to use this medicine if you’ve recently experienced a heart attack.

Don’t utilize amitriptyline if you’ve used an MAO inhibitor from the past fourteen days, including as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue collar, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Before taking amitriptyline, tell your doctor if you have used an SSRI antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa),  fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

You could have thoughts about suicide once you first begin taking an antidepressant such as amitriptyline, specially if you’re younger than 24 yrs. Your health care provider will have to check on you at regular visits to the first 1-2 weeks of treatment.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to a physician, for example as: mood or behavior changes, stress, anxiety attacks, sleep problems, or when you’re feeling  impulsive, irritable, irritated, aggressive, aggressive, nervous, hyperactive (emotionally or physically), more miserable, or have thoughts about suicide or self harming toughts.

Before taking this medicine

Avoid using this medicine if you are allergic to amitriptyline or  if you’ve recently experienced a heart attack.

To ensure amitriptyline is safe for you, tell your Physician if you have:

  • Bipolar disorder (manic-depression) or schizophrenia;
  • liver disease
  • A history of mental illness or psychosis
  • Diabetes (amitriptyline may raise or lower blood sugar);
  • A history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures.
  • Glaucoma
  • Problems with urination.

Some young men and women have thoughts about suicide if taking a antidepressant. Your physician will check your progress at regular visits. Your family members or other caretakers  also needs to be attentive to changes in your mood or outward symptoms.

It isn’t known if amitriptyline will harm an unborn baby. Tell your physician if you are  planning to become pregnant while using this medication or you are pregnant.

Amitriptyline can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby.  Avoid breast-feeding while you are using amitriptyline.

Amitriptyline is not approved for use under 12 years olds.

How should I take amitriptyline?

Take amitriptyline exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Don’t take this medication in smaller or larger numbers or for more than advised.

It might use upto four weeks until your symptoms change. Continue using the drug as directed and tell your physician if your symptoms don’t change.

If you require surgery, tell your physician before time that you’re using amitriptyline. You might want to quit applying the medicine for a brief moment.

Don’t quit using amitriptyline unexpectedly, or you might suffer unpleasant withdrawal signs. Consult your physician to safely quit using amitriptyline.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose when it is almost time for the next dose. Don’t take additional medicine to make up the dose.

What happens if I overdose?

An Overdose  of amitriptyline could be fatal. Overdose symptoms could consist of irregular heart beats, vomiting,extreme drowsiness, confusion, hallucinations, feeling cold or hot, muscular stiffness, and seizure (convulsions), or even fainting.

What should I avoid while taking amitriptyline?

Don’t consume alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death might occur when alcohol has been coupled with amitriptyline.

This drug can impair your thinking or responses. Be cautious if you drive or do anything which requires one to become attentive.

Avoid exposure to the sun or tanning beds. Amitriptyline could cause you to sunburn easier.

Amitriptyline side effects

Get emergency help if you have signs of an allergic response to amitriptyline:

  • Hives 
  • Swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Difficulty breathing

Report any new or worsening symptoms to a physician, for example as: mood or behavior changes, stress, anxiety attacks, sleep problems, or when you’re feeling irritable, irritated, aggressive, aggressive, nervous, hyperactive (emotionally or physically), more miserable, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting your self.

Call your physician at once if you have:

  • unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • Abnormal heartbeat or fluttering in your chest;
  • confusion, hallucinations;
  • a seizure (convulsions);
  • severe constipation;

Amitriptyline side effects that are common may include:

  • Diarrhea;
  • Upset stomach, nausea, vomiting
  • Mouth pain, unusual taste, black tongue
  • Appetite or weight changes;
  • itching or rash

This isn’t a complete set of side effects and others may occur. Discuss with your Doctor about these side effects. 

What other drugs will affect amitriptyline?

Taking this medicine with other drugs that make you sleepy even worsen. Consult your doctor before using amitriptyline with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Discuss your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, particularly:

  • other antidepressants;
  • cimetidine;
  • heart rhythm medicine such as flecainide, quinidine,propafenone, and others; or
  • medicine to treat mental illness.

This listing isn’t complete. Other medications may interact such as over-the-counter and prescription medications, vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Not all interactions are recorded in this medication guide.